A Fall Afternoon in Bodie

Bodie State Park

It’s a chilly late-October afternoon in Bodie.

Bodie State Park

Windows reflect the bright sky even after the buildings are shaded
by the hills west of town.

Bodie State Park

It’s time to pull up a comfy chair and watch the sunset.

Bodie State Park

In the cemetery this year, the park has been rebuilding old-style wooden fences around some of the graves that needed better protection. The new wood is still bright, but it will darken over the coming year.  Bodie State Park

Many of the older iron fences still remain.

Bodie State Park

Is there comfort in knowing your fence was made by the “Up-To-Date Mfg. Co.” and came all the way from Terre Haute, Indiana? (Here’s a link to their 1911 catalog.)

 


Copyright © 2016 Tim Messick. All rights reserved.
See also Tim Messick Photography and the Bodie Hills Plants blog.

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Busters (Update)

Busters Food MarketThe old market in Bridgeport (Mono County, CA), 1967–2011, is still closed. In just the last couple of years, the big sign on the outside has lost some letters, the paint has faded, and the “For Sale” signs have been replaced with a street artist’s tag. A lot of folks miss Buster’s. Check out the reviews on Yelp.

Busters Food Market


Copyright © 2016 Tim Messick. All rights reserved.
See also Tim Messick Photography and the Bodie Hills Plants blog.

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Frog Lakes

So, our President-Elect thinks the human factor in climate change is a hoax. Our VP-Elect thinks evolution is a hoax. They will probably fill their Cabinet with like-minded deniers of objective reality. Darker times are ahead for the land and biodiversity, I’m afraid. I just wish they could pull their heads out of the political filth and decompress for a while in a place like this . . . .

Middle Frog Lake and the crest of the Sierra Nevada.

Last month I returned to Virginia Lakes (Mono County, CA, west of Conway Summit) and hiked up beyond Cooney Lake to the next set of lakes — Frog Lakes. There are three lakes at Frog Lakes, without official names, as far as I can tell, so I’ll call them Upper, Middle, and Lower Frog Lakes. Surface elevations are approximately 10,371, 10,367, and 10,360 feet above sea level, respectively (according to Google Earth, which can be several yards off in elevations).

Frog Lakes

Upper Frog Lake.

Headwaters of Virginia Creek

Looking toward the headwaters of Virginia Creek.
Near treeline with mostly whitebark pines (Pinus albicaulis).

Frog Lakes

There are frogs (and toads) at Frog Lakes—lots of them. Down there, in the meadows around Middle Frog Lake, I saw Sierran treefrogs (Pseudacris sierra) and California toads (Anaxyrus boreas halophilus). They all thought I was a predator, though, and wouldn’t hold still long enough to be properly photographed.

Frog Lakes

Upper Frog Lake.

Frog Lakes

Grasses submerged near the shore of Upper Frog Lake, with floating leaves:
Weak manna grass, Torreyochloa pallida var. pauciflora.

Frog Lakes

Torreyochloa, one of many plants named for named for
19th-century American botanist John Torrey.

Frog Lakes

Lower Frog Lake. Across that ridge and a bit lower
in elevation is the Green Creek watershed.

Frog Lakes

Fall colors in dwarf bilberry (a wild blueberry), Vaccinium cespitosum.

Frog Lakes

Glacial striations on granite between Lower Frog Lake and Cooney Lake.
The lichen is, I think, “brown tile lichen,” Lecidea atrobrunnea,
which is common on Sierran granites.

Frog Lakes map

An annotated aerial view, from Google Earth.

 


Copyright © 2016 Tim Messick. All rights reserved.
See also Tim Messick Photography and the Bodie Hills Plants blog.

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