Panum Crater Sunset

Panum Crater at sunset

Panum Crater, on the south side of Mono Lake, at the north end of Mono Craters, is one of the newest additions to the volcanic landscape of the American west (under 700 years old). The smooth rim of the crater and the jagged plug in the middle offer great views in all directions. Sunset is a nice time to be there.

Panum Crater at sunset

Peak 12,568, between Mt. Gibbs (hidden) and Mt. Dana (right).

Panum Crater at sunset

The Minarets (left) and Mount Ritter/Banner Peak
(right, appearing as one).
Panum Crater at sunset
Panum Crater at sunset

Looking north, across Mono Lake to the Bodie Hills.

Panum Crater at sunset

 


Copyright © 2018 Tim Messick. All rights reserved.
See also Tim Messick Photography and the Bodie Hills Plants blog.

Posted in Nature, Photography, Travel | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Bodie, on Film for a Change

I haven’t shot film at Bodie in, well, decades. So, with a recently acquired YashikaMat EM, I wanted to see how a different camera (a twin lens reflex so very different from a DSLR, mirrorless Fuji, Light L-16, or iPhone) would change how I see and what images I make at Bodie.

Bodie

Bodie

Bodie

Bodie

Bodie

Bodie

Composing backwards and leveling the horizon in reverse is challenging, as is capturing but not over-correcting the personality of a color film (expired Portra 400 and fresh Portra 160) in a scan. Scanning black & white (expired BW400CN) was a little easier.

Bodie

Bodie

Bodie

 


Copyright © 2018 Tim Messick. All rights reserved.
See also Tim Messick Photography and the Bodie Hills Plants blog.

 

Posted in Photography, Travel | Tagged , , , | 6 Comments

Moonless Night Skies, with Film

The RB-67

The RB-67 is loaded, focused, and waiting for nightfall.

It seems like everyone is shooting star trails these days, by stacking lots and lots of several-minute digital exposures. It’s easy. I do it too. It’s very cool, very technical, and the results can be really beautiful. But there’s a lot of waiting around in the cold, hoping the sensor doesn’t overheat and the batteries don’t quit. Then in post-processing there’s a lot of fussing over noise, hot pixels, blending modes, and those annoying little gaps where the star trail segments meet.

Then there is film. You open the shutter, go to bed, set the alarm for sometime pre-dawn, get up and close the shutter, take a leak, and go back to bed. You still have to scan the negative, remove a lot of micro-dust spots, and adjust the exposure, contrast, and color. There are trade-offs, but I rather like this “analog” alternative. And while the film is exposing, you can pop off some 20-second, super-high ISO images of the Milky Way with the digital thing.

While I was camping at Berlin-Ichthyosaur State Park on a recent moonless night, deep in the outback of Nevada, I made a few very-long exposures on film. The images below are 2, 6, and 8 hours long, on Kodak Portra 800, using a Mamiya RB-67 (which I’ve had since high school) with a 50 mm lens at f/5.6.

A 2-hour exposure

2 hours, looking north.

A 6-hour exposure

6 hours, looking north. I like this one best.

An 8-hour exposure

8 hours, looking south. Impressive, but not as interesting.
That brightest trail is Mars.

 


Copyright © 2018 Tim Messick. All rights reserved.
See also Tim Messick Photography and the Bodie Hills Plants blog.

Posted in Night Photography, Photography | Tagged , , , , , , | 5 Comments