Manzanar

Manzanar Relocation Center was one of ten places where Japanese Americans were interned while the U.S. was at war with Japan during World War II.  It’s in the Owens Valley, just north of the Mojave desert and in the shadow of the highest peaks in the Sierra Nevada. It’s very hot and dry in the summer; very cold and dry in winter. The camp was operated from March 1942 to November 1945. It’s population peaked in late 1942 at just over 10,000 people.

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Historic photo printed on screen in reconstructed mess hall kitchen.

The history of Manzanar is too complex to recount here, but it’s well worth looking into (see links at the end of this post). The place itself, now a National Historic Site, is well worth a visit if you’re in Inyo County. The Park Service has reconstructed one of the mess halls and a couple of dormitories.

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Vintage truck and reconstructed mess hall.

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Kitchen chimneys and Mount Williamson.

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Reconstructed dormitory.

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Guard tower and Inyo Mountains.

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Not all who came to Manzanar were able to leave when the war ended; 15 remained in the cemetery just outside the west perimeter of the camp.

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Cemetery monument and Mount Williamson
(14,389 feet, second highest peak the Sierra Nevada).

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“Soul consoling tower.”

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Decorations from the latest annual Manzanar Pilgrimage (link).

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Offerings at the cemetery monument.

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Some Manzanar links:

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Tim Messick Photography • Graphics
Copyright © 2013 Tim Messick. All rights reserved.

About Tim Messick

Photographer, cartographer, and botanist/naturalist. Home is in Davis, California. Home-away-from-home is the eastern Sierra Nevada. Compiling a flora of the Bodie Hills.
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